Friday, November 16, 2012
What a beautiful, minimalist alternate book cover for an equally wonderful book!

What a beautiful, minimalist alternate book cover for an equally wonderful book!

Sunday, November 4, 2012 Saturday, November 3, 2012

Looking for Alaska Minamalist Posters
“I go to seek a Great Perhaps.” 

Friday, November 2, 2012
violaet:


the perks of being a wallflowerstephen chbosky

i’m not gonna lie, i heard the film adaption was gonna be big so i decided to read the book first. i’ve heard great things about it and i’ve been wanting to read it for a long time. it’s not as great as i expected, although it’s good nonetheless. charlie’s awkwardness is totally relate-able, in my case, which is only one of the reasons why i loved him so much. i also very much enjoyed the development of his relationships with others, especially sam, since that was something he’d been working on improving since the beginning of his story. his own journey of development and transformation into maturity was an interesting one to follow, as well. the significance of that change drew me in more and more into the book, but what i found intriguing was how his writing style never changed. it’s like he’s still charlie, but not the same charlie we were first introduced to at the beginning of the book.i’m very excited about the movie, although i don’t think it would do the book justice (yes, i am aware that chbosky himself has written and directed it but i simply do not have faith in book-to-movie adaptions).

violaet:

the perks of being a wallflower
stephen chbosky

i’m not gonna lie, i heard the film adaption was gonna be big so i decided to read the book first. i’ve heard great things about it and i’ve been wanting to read it for a long time. it’s not as great as i expected, although it’s good nonetheless. charlie’s awkwardness is totally relate-able, in my case, which is only one of the reasons why i loved him so much. i also very much enjoyed the development of his relationships with others, especially sam, since that was something he’d been working on improving since the beginning of his story. his own journey of development and transformation into maturity was an interesting one to follow, as well. the significance of that change drew me in more and more into the book, but what i found intriguing was how his writing style never changed. it’s like he’s still charlie, but not the same charlie we were first introduced to at the beginning of the book.
i’m very excited about the movie, although i don’t think it would do the book justice (yes, i am aware that chbosky himself has written and directed it but i simply do not have faith in book-to-movie adaptions).

violaet:


parrotfishby ellen wittlinger

the cover of the book was what had first caught my eye. i generally hate fish, but when there’s colors involved? screw that. i picked it up, read the blurb, and took ‒ no, snatched ‒ it. i know of a tumblr user who’s experiencing the same sort of thing the main character of this book is going through, so i thought i might read the book to find our more about what it’s like to be transgender. i’m not saying that all trans people are the same ‒ i know for sure that no one is the same, trans or not. i’ve just always been curious as to how people deal with their identity. so i started reading.grady is an amazing character ‒ determined, courageous, patient, and humorous. i loved the way ellen wittlinger portrayed his thoughts, especially in the following quote:

People changed their hair and dieted themselves down to near death. They took steroids to build muscles and got breast implants and nose jobs so they resemble their favorite movie stars. They changed names and majors and jobs and husbands and wives. They changed religions and political parties. They move across the country or the world ‒ even changed nationalities. Why was gender the one sacred thing we weren’t supposed to change? Who made that rule?

i did not, however, enjoy the storyline with kita. there was so much buildup and potential, but it all came crashing down and that was that. i also found it strange how throughout most of the book nearly everyone who surrounded grady was  anti-trans, and then all of a sudden everyone changed their minds and admired his bravery instead. the ending, too, was very poor and totally expected.i did, to some extent, enjoy the book, although i wouldn’t read it again, nor would i recommend it to anyone.

violaet:

parrotfish
by ellen wittlinger

the cover of the book was what had first caught my eye. i generally hate fish, but when there’s colors involved? screw that. i picked it up, read the blurb, and took  no, snatched ‒ it. i know of a tumblr user who’s experiencing the same sort of thing the main character of this book is going through, so i thought i might read the book to find our more about what it’s like to be transgender. i’m not saying that all trans people are the same ‒ i know for sure that no one is the same, trans or not. i’ve just always been curious as to how people deal with their identity. so i started reading.
grady is an amazing character ‒ determined, courageous, patient, and humorous. i loved the way ellen wittlinger portrayed his thoughts, especially in the following quote:

People changed their hair and dieted themselves down to near death. They took steroids to build muscles and got breast implants and nose jobs so they resemble their favorite movie stars. They changed names and majors and jobs and husbands and wives. They changed religions and political parties. They move across the country or the world ‒ even changed nationalities. Why was gender the one sacred thing we weren’t supposed to change? Who made that rule?

i did not, however, enjoy the storyline with kita. there was so much buildup and potential, but it all came crashing down and that was that. i also found it strange how throughout most of the book nearly everyone who surrounded grady was  anti-trans, and then all of a sudden everyone changed their minds and admired his bravery instead. the ending, too, was very poor and totally expected.
i did, to some extent, enjoy the book, although i wouldn’t read it again, nor would i recommend it to anyone.